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Roasted Cherry Tomatoes - Linda Weisberg
Roasted Cherry Tomatoes - Linda Weisberg
By Linda Weisberg @ 10:01 PM :: 12549 Views :: 1234 Comments :: :: All, Salads, Entrees / Main Courses

Food Editor's Notes:  Linda swears by this recipe and you will see why when you give it a try.  You won't believe how easy and delicious it is!  Use ripe, locally grown cherry tomatoes for the best result.  Roasting brings out the smoky sweetness of their unique, fresh flavor.  I use 2 tablespoons of chopped basil, lightly packed, and 2 teaspoons of thyme leaves, but Linda says to feel free to adjust the amounts or substitute other herbs for the basil and thyme if you wish.  The tomato juices mix with the olive oil and herbs in the pan to create a delicious sauce.  Scrape out everything into a bowl and serve over pasta or as a side with meat, chicken, or fish.  It is good hot, warm, or at room temperature.  This recipe can easily be doubled or tripled for a crowd.

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Linguine with Fresh Tomatoes and Herbs
Linguine with Fresh Tomatoes and Herbs
By Jamie Stolper @ 10:27 AM :: 14815 Views :: 1584 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Holidays

My husband loves this simple pasta dish that is healthy, colorful, and full of fresh tastes.  It should be made in summer, when tomatoes are locally grown and full of flavor.  The sauce requires no cooking – the tomatoes and herbs marinate in the oil for a while and then are warmed by the hot pasta.

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Vegetarian Lasagna
Vegetarian Lasagna
By Norene Gilletz @ 4:31 PM :: 5650 Views :: 263 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Holidays, Dairy, Vegetarian

Food Editor's Note:

Food Editor’s Note: I love this lasagna! Its title in Norene’s cookbook is Luscious Lasagna, and the name couldn’t be more apt. The other great thing about this dish is how healthy it is for a lasagna, chock full of all kinds of vegetables. You can make the sauce on one occasion and refrigerate or freeze it until you are ready to assemble the lasagna. This is a great dish for a family dinner or informal get-together with friends. Prepare it in advance, but cook it just before serving - it will be puffed and golden and smell heavenly.

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Linguine with Fresh Tomoatoes and Herbs
Linguine with Fresh Tomoatoes and Herbs
By Jamie Stolper @ 4:30 PM :: 5166 Views :: 271 Comments :: :: All, Salads, Entrees / Main Courses, Pareve

My husband loves this simple pasta dish that is healthy, colorful, and full of fresh tastes.  It should be made in summer, when tomatoes are locally grown and full of flavor.  The sauce requires no cooking – the tomatoes and herbs marinate in the oil for a while and then are warmed by the hot pasta.

 
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Lemon Mergingue Pie
Lemon Mergingue Pie
By Judy Rosenberg @ 4:26 PM :: 7232 Views :: 270 Comments :: :: All, Desserts, Entrees / Main Courses, Dairy, Pareve

Food Editor's Note:

This is a delicious dessert when you want something different, dramatic, and not too heavy. The combination of crisp crust, sweet-tart filling, and airy meringue is truly a satisfying combination. Judy’s version is very reliable - the filling sets up beautifully and the meringue is just the right consistency. You will need to make this dessert at least eight hours in advance, but the actual preparation time is less than an hour if you use a store-bought pie crust that you bake at home. This is a winner!

 
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No-Cook Lazy Day Beet Borscht
No-Cook Lazy Day Beet Borscht
By Norene Gilletz @ 4:19 PM :: 5214 Views :: 224 Comments :: :: All, Salads, Entrees / Main Courses, Dairy, Vegetarian

Food Editor’s Note: Food Editor’s Note: This is a great summer soup from Norene Gilletz, author of several popular kosher cookbooks. The borscht is easy to make, cold and refreshing, and beautiful in appearance. Serve it in glass mugs for an elegant presentation. This recipe took no more than ten minutes to prepare from start to finish. Traditional borscht recipes call for sour cream as the dairy ingredient, but Norene has substituted buttermilk - it is healthier, the texture is smooth and creamy, and the taste is wonderful. The borscht aficionados in my family gave it their seal of approval! [Norene lives in Canada, so I have adjusted the amounts in Norene’s original recipe to correspond to U.S. measurements and packaging. You can easily double this recipe to serve a crowd or to have on hand in the fridge for quick lunches.]

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Kreplach
Kreplach
By Rosalind Joffe @ 4:18 PM :: 4921 Views :: 228 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays

As I was growing up, one of my grandmother's specialties was a meat-filled kreplach which she made in great batches every year before the high holidays. We would eat some on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, and then freeze the rest in small plastic bags and bring them out on special occasions throughout the year. These were like gold in our family -- they were counted out carefully, watched over constantly once put on one's plate (lest a table neighbor get mischievous), and bartered for in creative ways. In later years, after I was married, my grandmother would come to my house to make the kreplach. (One brazen, but still-loved, sibling was caught more than once raiding my freezer for the valuable packages.) I have precious videotape of Grandma rolling out the handmade dough, placing the meat filling onto the cut up pieces, and pinching the edges together before dropping into the boiling water. I have no written recipe from her, however, as she never used one -- everything was done by look or feel or taste. She measured water into the dough in the cracked eggshells and she sniffed the meat filling to see if there was the right amount of onion.

 

After I was married, I discovered that kreplach were also a specialty of my husband's grandmother. Nana's kreplach looked and tasted different, but were equally treasured in her family and I came to love them also. Nana's kreplach were smaller and had rounded edges, while Grandma's were larger triangles with pointed edges. Nana's dough was thicker, but the filling was made with cooked flanken or brisket; Grandma's dough was thinner and filled with hamburger meat. Nana's were served in chicken soup or pan-fried in oil or margarine, while Grandma's were either served in soup or broiled gently with a shmear of chicken fat.

 

After both our grandmothers passed away, my husband David and I finally decided it was time to make our own kreplach. In honor and memory of our two grandmothers, we make a version that is a combination of both of their recipes, and includes a short cut or two. Making kreplach the old-fashioned way all in one session is a time-consuming activity, taking hours to produce these treasured morsels that are consumed in a flash. We always marvel at how our elderly grandmothers managed to make these themselves, in small kitchens without the modern conveniences that we have today. DO NOT BE INTIMIDATED BY THE LENGTH OF THIS RECIPE. There are many steps, but they are not difficult, and they don't have to be done all at one time. You can also halve the recipe and, although you'll get only about 50 kreplach, it will take much less time and labor.

 

We serve kreplach only to our most special guests, and hope that they taste the love and history that goes into each one.

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Italian Beef Stew with Rosemary
Italian Beef Stew with Rosemary
By Jamie Stolper @ 4:10 PM :: 4021 Views :: 145 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays

This is a very flavorful beef stew that is a favorite with my family. My oldest son, now living on his own, always requested this dish when he came home from college. The stew is fairly spicy - thanks to the onion, garlic, and black pepper - but tastes wonderful accompanied with noodles, rice, or even boiled or mashed potatoes. I make a double batch of this recipe and freeze half for a future dinner.

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Hungarian Potatoes
Hungarian Potatoes
By Babs Glazier @ 4:06 PM :: 9420 Views :: 152 Comments :: :: All, Salads, Entrees / Main Courses, Holidays, Dairy

This is a potato casserole that my Hungarian mother always made and was a family favorite.  One year it occurred to me that it was perfect for Passover.  I didn't really have the recipe written down so I tried my best to create it.  It is actually better reheated the second day.  My mother mixes it up before reheating so more parts get crispy.  I like how it looks, though, so I leave it as is.

 

Food Editor's Note:  This is the winner of the Passover 2003 ShalomBoston.com Recipe Contest!  It is a delicious departure from the typical potato dish – satisfying and creamy, with the unexpected added taste of eggs and a bit of tang from the sour cream.  With a few simple ingredients and easy instructions, this is a great addition to our recipe file.  Serve the potatoes as a side with a fish entree or with a salad for a complete main course.

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Honey Orange Chicken
Honey Orange Chicken
By Jamie Stolper @ 4:02 PM :: 7444 Views :: 323 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Poultry, Holidays

This is based on Joan Nathan's recipe in her original edition of The Jewish Holiday Kitchen (Schocken Books, 1979).  Joan uses whole chickens, cut up, but I have adapted it for boneless, skinless chicken breasts.  This recipe is easier than it looks and really tastes delicious.  The chicken stays moist and there is a wonderful just-sweet-enough sauce to go with the chicken and any rice or other grain side dish you choose.  Leftovers, if there are any, are good cold.  I have a natural aversion to reheated chicken (me and Julia Child!), but I've found that you can re-heat this chicken in the sauce – covered, at a low temperature, in the oven or at a reduced power level in the microwave – with little loss in flavor.  This is a wonderful dish to serve for a Rosh Hashanah dinner.

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