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Articles from Passover
Molded Cranberry Relish
Molded Cranberry Relish
By Vivienne Kalman @ 2:56 PM :: 3075 Views :: 240 Comments :: :: All, Salads, Holidays, Passover, Pareve

Food Editor's Note:

This is a delicious alternative to the traditional cranberry relish. It is sweet, but not too sweet, crunchy, but without nuts, and beautiful to present on a round glass serving dish. It is very popular in our family and even the children love it. You will need an 8 1/2-cup ring mold for this recipe, which makes about 16 good-size servings. Prepare this at least one day in advance, refrigerate, and unmold just before serving.

 
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Cranberry Brisket
Cranberry Brisket
By Arlene Levin @ 2:52 PM :: 19253 Views :: 2488 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays, Passover
Food Editor’s Note:  I had a delicious brisket made with cranberry sauce one year on Chanukah at my cousin Sue Ellyn’s, but never did get the recipe.  So when my friend Sue Friedman told me she had the best, easiest recipe for brisket ever, made with just two extra ingredients including cranberry sauce, I saw this as my chance to get a great recipe for ShalomBoston.com.  Sue got this from her friend Arlene Levin and says that it’s her favorite “so easy it’s embarrassing” recipe!  Try it for yourself and I’m sure you’ll agree.

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Cheese Kugel
Cheese Kugel
By Carol Rosenstock @ 2:49 PM :: 7892 Views :: 479 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Holidays, Passover, Dairy, Vegetarian

This is a recipe that a friend gave me a few years ago.  I add raisins to it and think it makes a great lunch or dairy dinner with a salad.  It is very rich and creamy.

Food Editor's Notes:  This is one of our 2006 Passover Recipe Contest winners!  You won't believe how light and fluffy (yet still rich and creamy) a Passover kugel can be!  This is basically a sweet cheese noodle kugel without the noodles.  The farfel helps to hold it together, but doesn't make it dense or heavy.  This is a sweet treat – it comes out of the oven a beautiful golden brown and puffed up high.  It's best served like this, right from the oven – perfect for a brunch or company supper - but it's also wonderful reheated for breakfast, lunch, or a special snack.

 
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Charoset (Traditional)
Charoset (Traditional)
By Jamie Stolper @ 2:47 PM :: 5562 Views :: 307 Comments :: :: All, Salads, Holidays, Passover, Vegetarian

This is your basic, Ashkenazic-style charoset. I always leave this for the afternoon before the first seder and make it a project with one or more of my sons. They enjoy tasting it as we go along and adjusting for their preferred ratio of apples, nuts, cinnamon, and wine. We make more than enough for the two seders, because we like to nosh on it all week.

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Charoset, Mortar-Style
Charoset, Mortar-Style
By Karla Hailer-Fidelman @ 2:44 PM :: 3509 Views :: 133 Comments :: :: All, Salads, Holidays, Passover

Here’s the story behind this recipe. I was asked to bring charoset to the nth annual potluck seder a bunch of my friends threw every year. Having never made charoset before, I dutifully searched through Jewish cookbooks and articles to make the perfect charoset. I decided I needed walnuts, apples, wine and honey.

 

The first error was that I didn't think I was chopping the walnuts fine enough and threw them into my food processor and started grinding away. As things began to turn to paste, I kept adding more apples to “chunk” it up and wine to get the right color, because I thought the apples looked too white against what was now the walnut paste. The wine turned everything this really interesting purplish color. At that point I figured the honey was totally out of the question.

 

Slightly embarrassed, but having used the entire pound of walnuts, I brought it to the potluck seder. The host took one look, cracked up, and someone ran out to the hardware store around the corner to buy a “Pesadich” trowel to serve the charoset. It actually worked quite nicely when we made Hillel sandwiches (and for leftovers). It soon became a tradition for me to bring the mortar type of charoset and someone else was assigned to bring a “traditional” charoset.

 

I should note that this is best served with Larry’s killer homemade horseradish rather than the stuff from a jar.

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Confetti Vegetable Kugel
Confetti Vegetable Kugel
By Norene Gilletz @ 6:53 PM :: 7337 Views :: 258 Comments :: :: All, Holidays, Passover, Vegetarian

Food Editor’s Note: I have made this vegetable kugel with both sweet potatoes and white potatoes and both were delicious. As a potato kugel lover, however, I have to admit I preferred the one with white potatoes (and a bit less black pepper). The added vegetables and seasonings give it color and a unique flavor. I was a bit absent-minded when I made this and used the shredding disc in my food processor, instead of the grating disc, but the kugel came out beautifully just the same. This is an interesting and healthy side dish to serve a crowd, especially during Passover, when you want something traditional (what’s more traditional than a potato kugel!), yet different. I suggest using a 10 by 15-inch glass casserole dish. Serve the kugel immediately or reheat in the oven to retain its crispiness.

This recipe is from Norene’s cookbook MealLeaniYumm! Norene is also the author of one of my all-time favorite cookbooks, The Pleasures of Your Processor, which she has recently updated and retitled The Food Processor Bible (see footer for more information). All her cookbooks are kosher, provide practical details (about freezing, for example), and are generally informative and easy-to-use.

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Company Stuffed Spuds
Company Stuffed Spuds
By jcroen @ 6:52 PM :: 1965 Views :: 126 Comments :: :: All, Passover

Food Editor's Notes:  This is a wonderful alternative to the traditional Potato Kugel on Jewish holidays, especially on Passover, when potatoes are the typical starch accompaniment to the entrée.  These can be prepared in advance and look very elegant when served.  You could probably experiment with the vegetables and herbs in the stuffing mixture, although Norene's version has great taste, texture, and color!  Norene says she makes these a lot in her catering business – a sure sign that they are easy to make in advance and for a crowd!

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Chopped Liver
Chopped Liver
By Vivienne Kalman @ 6:45 PM :: 4527 Views :: 183 Comments :: :: All, Meat, Holidays, Passover

Food Editor's Notes:

This is one of my mother’s specialties. She has cut down on the fat by using mayonnaise or soup instead of added chicken fat, but it is still delicious. Do not process this too fine; there should be some small chunks left to provide texture. I freeze the livers from all my chickens year-round, so that my mother will have an ample supply for our Rosh Hashanah and Passover meals.

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Chicken with Apricots and Figs
Chicken with Apricots and Figs
By Suzanne Weixel @ 6:06 PM :: 28055 Views :: 245 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Poultry, Holidays, Passover

Food Editor's Notes:

This is an easy, elegant dish that is well-suited for a Passover seder or other special occasion. You can marinate the chicken in advance, pop it in the oven 45 minutes to an hour before you want to serve it, and make a dramatic entrance with an unusual, but delicious entrée. It can also be made in advance and reheated or served cold or at room temperature. Although the recipe calls for boneless chicken breasts, I like to use whole chickens cut in eighths. Remove the smaller pieces first or cook them in a separate pan for less time so they don’t dry out.

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Charoset (Traditional)
Charoset (Traditional)
By Jamie Stolper @ 5:56 PM :: 3095 Views :: 338 Comments :: :: All, Holidays, Passover, Pareve, Vegetarian

This is your basic, Ashkenazic-style charoset. I always leave this for the afternoon before the first seder and make it a project with one or more of my sons. They enjoy tasting it as we go along and adjusting for their preferred ratio of apples, nuts, cinnamon, and wine. We make more than enough for the two seders, because we like to nosh on it all week.

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