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Chinese Vegetable Soup
Chinese Vegetable Soup
By Jamie Stolper @ 18:13 :: 10537 Views :: 656 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Poultry

This is a simple soup that everyone loves.  It is easy to make if you have the chicken stock ready – I make it for my family using the leftover soup from Shabbat dinner.  You can use any vegetables you like – try bell peppers, baby corn, water chestnuts, or various types of Chinese mushrooms.  The vegetables stay crunchy and fresh-tasting as they are not cooked or boiled in the soup and, because they are divided among each soup bowl, you can give each person (child!) exactly the vegetables they like.  This recipe is for a crowd and makes 12 large bowls of soup – for smaller servings, use 12 cups of stock and reduce the seasonings accordingly.

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Chili with Beef and Beans
Chili with Beef and Beans
By Jamie Stolper @ 18:10 :: 3550 Views :: 111 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays

This recipe is an adaptation of one I found years ago in an old cookbook of the Sisterhood of Congregation Mishkan Tefila in Newton. It is pure comfort food to me and my favorite chili recipe. It is easy to make (you don’t have to chop chili peppers!), easy to serve, and will satisfy a hungry crowd. This version is medium spicy, but you can use more chili powder or cayenne pepper to add more zip!

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Classic Chicken Soup
Classic Chicken Soup
By Jamie Stolper @ 18:05 :: 3779 Views :: 119 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Poultry, Holidays

Our debut feature recipe is classic chicken soup. I wanted our inaugural recipe to be something traditional, something special, something memorable. But chicken soup? Doesn't everyone know how to make chicken soup? Maybe. But here is the version that my husband calls "the elixir of life." I make this stock every Thursday evening (for Shabbat dinner the next night), before every Jewish holiday, when a family member is sick, and whenever I have a good excuse. I use the stock as is, with noodles or other starch additives, or doctor it up to make a Chinese-style soup or a vegetable soup. I have a secret, though, that keeps me from being tied to my stovetop for hours, a secret passed down from my grandmother to my mother to me: Use a pressure cooker! My pressure cooker is probably the pot used most in my kitchen. I have three sizes for year-round use (the inexpensive Presto brand), and another set for Passover. Once the pot is put on the burner, the stock is done in about 30 minutes. If you insist, you can use a regular stockpot, but be prepared to stick around for two or three hours. Here it is: my easy, quick version of the Jewish penicillin.

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My Mother's Cabbage Soup (meat)
My Mother's Cabbage Soup (meat)
By Julie Weisman @ 17:43 :: 3945 Views :: 126 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays

My mother makes a delicious cabbage soup.  I had never made it, but felt that I should.  So, on a snowy day when we couldn’t really go anywhere, I decided to get the recipe and make the soup.
I called my mother for the recipe.  She said, “First I take the soup bones and the meat and boil it up for a couple of hours.  No, first I sauté the onions in my big soup pot, then put in the bones and the meat.”
How many soup bones so you use?
“Well, I use four – because I need to have one for each of my grand-dogs – but you only have two dogs so you probably only need two bones.”
I did not think I could write up the recipe saying: Use as many soup bones as you have dogs.  So, I attempted to quantify amounts.  The thing to remember is that it would be hard to mess this soup up.  So if you have more or less dogs, it is ok.  If you want it meatier, use a bigger piece of brisket.  It will be delicious.

Food Editor's Note:  This is delicious!  I made it with almost 3 pounds of brisket, as I love a good, meaty soup.  But you definitely need a very large pot – 12 quarts would be best.  I made the beef stock in an 8-quart pot, my largest, but I had to do the second phase in two pots!  You can make the beef stock in advance and refrigerate or freeze it until you are ready to continue.  Cut up the tomatoes before adding to the pot, or just break them up towards the end of the cooking when they are soft.  This recipe makes a lot of soup – about 6 quarts, which serves 12 or more.

 
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Butternut Squash and Apple Soup
Butternut Squash and Apple Soup
By Julie Weisman @ 17:40 :: 2844 Views :: 142 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Holidays

This recipe is fast and easy, especially if you buy pre-peeled squash and use canned chicken broth.  It's a great soup for Thanksgiving as a first course, or as a meal with salad and bread.

 

Food Editor's Note:  This is delicious!  You can make a pareve version by substituting vegetable broth for the chicken stock.

 
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Beef and Barley Soup
Beef and Barley Soup
By Babs Glazier @ 15:56 :: 3527 Views :: 135 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat

My family loves this soup. The original recipe given to me called for 1/2 cup chopped green pepper to be added with the other vegetables and 1/4 cup chopped parsley to be added towards the end. My kids don’t like green things floating in their soup, however, so I’ve eliminated them. If your family doesn’t mind, try adding them back in or using your own combination of vegetables.

 
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Low-Fat Matzo Balls
Low-Fat Matzo Balls
By Norene Gilletz @ 19:39 :: 6052 Views :: 254 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Passover

Club soda is the secret ingredient to make these knaidlach (matzo balls) light and fluffy! This recipe can be doubled easily, but be sure to use a large pot and don't peek during cooking!

Food Editor’s Note: I’m always wary of low-fat versions of anything, because often taste is compromised. Not so with these matzo balls! They are just the right consistency (not too hard, not too soft) and quite flavorful. The dill adds a nice touch that complements the chicken soup, both in taste and color.

This recipe is from Norene’s cookbook MealLeaniYumm! Norene is also the author of one of my all-time favorite cookbooks, The Pleasures of Your Processor, which she has recently updated and retitled The Food Processor Bible (see footer for more information). All her cookbooks are kosher, provide practical details (about freezing, for example), and are generally informative and easy-to-use.

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Minestrone Soup (pareve, with dairy and meat variations)
Minestrone Soup (pareve, with dairy and meat variations)
By @ 19:34 :: 125929 Views :: 32 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Pareve, Vegetarian

Food Editor's Notes:  This is a delicious, healthful, and hearty soup that is easy to make.  Aside from a few basics that are identified with minestrone, such as tomatoes, beans, and Italian spices (basil, oregano, parsley), you can add whatever vegetables, pasta, and cooking liquids you have available in your refrigerator or pantry or whatever strikes your fancy.  This is also a versatile dish for the kosher kitchen, as it can be made pareve to serve with any meal, with no loss of flavor.  Sprinkling with parmigiana cheese just before serving is a dairy option, and using beef or chicken stock, or adding meat, makes a fleishig version that is even heartier and could easily serve as a main course.  Julie makes her minestrone with beef stock and hamburger meat.  Others use soup bones or pieces of chuck.  The amount of liquids used is also discretionary, depending on whether you like your minestrone thicker or soupier.  Add other vegetables if you wish, such as broccoli, cabbage, chick peas, or frozen corn or peas.  The assortment of ingredients adds not just flavor, but texture and color.  The recipe below is the version I made most recently and is totally pareve.  I could have used vegetable broth for part of the liquid, but I used just water and some red wine.  The flavor will of course vary with the specific ingredients used, but it is very hard to produce a less-than-delicious end-product.  The soup will usually thicken more when refrigerated, but just add more water, stock, or tomato juice or sauce, if you'd like to thin it out.  The recipe below can easily be doubled or tripled.

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Mushroom and Barley Soup (Meat, Dairy, or Pareve)
Mushroom and Barley Soup (Meat, Dairy, or Pareve)
By Sue Friedman @ 19:25 :: 4071 Views :: 201 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Dairy, Pareve

This mushroom and barley soup has a rich, thick texture and gives new meaning to the definition of comfort food! I think using fresh leeks instead of onions enhances the taste immeasurably. And, as is the case with most soups, the flavors intensify when refrigerated overnight.

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Passover Egg Soup
Passover Egg Soup
By Rosalind Joffe @ 16:08 :: 6943 Views :: 319 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Holidays

Food Editor's Notes:

My grandmother, of blessed memory, always made this for family seders. She chopped the eggs and onions by hand, and for large groups, this took some time. But with modern egg slicers and food processors, this refreshing first course is a breeze to make. Despite the cholesterol, almost everyone around the table partakes of this once-a-year treat. This dish is full of symbolism. The eggs are a traditional symbol of spring and new beginnings and the salt water reminds us of the tears the Israelites shed while slaves in Egypt. And now, for us, it evokes warm memories of Gram.

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