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Brisket with Lima Beans
Brisket with Lima Beans
By Julie Weisman @ 5:37 PM :: 34395 Views :: 415 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays

Even though people often don’t like the idea of lima beans, this is delicious. My mother, Joan Sudikoff, makes this dish. It is based on a recipe in the cookbook published by the Women’s Auxiliary of the Hebrew Rehabilitation Center.

Editor’s Note: One of our visitors requested a recipe for lima beans with beef, and I was surprised at the nostalgic reactions I received from people as I asked around for suggestions. From the ingredient list, you might think this is very tomatoey and sweet, but it is not. The gravy is delicious, there is plenty of it if you keep the roasting pan tightly covered with foil while cooking, and the carrots and beans do not get mushy (unless you freeze it). This is a very satisfying dish, one that Grandma probably made, and a little bit different from today’s common brisket variations. It is easy too – no browning the meat! – and will probably become one of your new family traditions!

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Brisket in Wine
Brisket in Wine
By Julie Weisman @ 5:36 PM :: 5537 Views :: 488 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays

In my family this has always been the “holiday” brisket. I make it pretty frequently now, even when it’s not a holiday, because my family likes it the most of all the different briskets.

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The Best All-Purpose Brisket and Gravy
The Best All-Purpose Brisket and Gravy
By Jamie Stolper @ 4:02 PM :: 9165 Views :: 279 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays

Many people like a sweet brisket, or one with a thick gravy, almost a glaze. This recipe is definitely not for that kind of brisket. I find that there are so many other sweet dishes at the Rosh Hashanah dinner table - raisin challah, apples and honey, honeyed carrots or sweet potatoes - that a savory, rather than sweet, brisket is a perfect main course. This recipe is for a savory brisket, one flavored with garlic and lots of onions, and produces a lot of thin gravy. This is just right for side dishes such as rice or kasha or mashed potatoes. (The gravy can also be thickened by pureeing some of the vegetables and adding to the liquid.)

 

Definitely make this in advance of when you want to serve it. The flavor improves with a day or two in the refrigerator. You may also freeze the brisket and gravy right in your serving dish (glass, pottery, or foil), remove to the refrigerator to defrost the day before serving, and just heat and serve. This is the easiest traditional main course to make for holiday gatherings, because it involves no last-minute cooking or preparation. It also is a perfect foil for any side dish, plain or fancy. I make this in my pressure cooker, so actual cooking time is very short, but you can use the traditional oven method. This recipe is adapted from one by Joan Nathan in The Jewish Holiday Kitchen (New York: Schocken Books, 1979).

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Beef and Barley Soup
Beef and Barley Soup
By Babs Glazier @ 3:56 PM :: 3536 Views :: 135 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat

My family loves this soup. The original recipe given to me called for 1/2 cup chopped green pepper to be added with the other vegetables and 1/4 cup chopped parsley to be added towards the end. My kids don’t like green things floating in their soup, however, so I’ve eliminated them. If your family doesn’t mind, try adding them back in or using your own combination of vegetables.

 
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Meat Rolled in Cabbage
Meat Rolled in Cabbage
By Barbara Lapp @ 7:38 PM :: 6750 Views :: 408 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays

Food Editor's Notes:

 

When my colleague suggested a recipe for stuffed cabbage, I immediately agreed, as stuffed cabbage is a traditional Jewish dish often served during Sukkot. It is much-loved, but suffers from the misconception that it is hard to make, and thus is not served very often, except by those for whom traditional Jewish foods reign supreme, never to be supplanted by more modern options, such as turkey breast and poached salmon. Stuffed cabbage can be made in advance, in fact, should be made in advance, as its flavor is enhanced with some time spent in the refrigerator or freezer. That makes it a wonderful, easy dish for entertaining, whether in the Sukkah or in your own dining room any time of year.

 

Julie's Auntie Barbara makes a mean stuffed cabbage, or meat rolled in cabbage as she refers to it. Auntie Barbara is of the school of cooks who don't usually use written recipes for their traditional dishes, but rather go by habit and taste and feel, and improvise based on what ingredients are on hand and how much time there is to get the job done. This recipe, I have found, is very forgiving. I had trouble peeling the cabbage leaves intact, I used dark brown sugar instead of granulated light brown sugar, I threw in some grated onion, and I guessed at the amounts of salt, pepper, sugar, and raisins. The result was still delicious. When the finished product came out of the oven, never mind that it was 10:30 in the morning, Julie and I decided we were in dire need of a taste test.

 
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Minestrone Soup (pareve, with dairy and meat variations)
Minestrone Soup (pareve, with dairy and meat variations)
By @ 7:34 PM :: 126312 Views :: 16 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Pareve, Vegetarian

Food Editor's Notes:  This is a delicious, healthful, and hearty soup that is easy to make.  Aside from a few basics that are identified with minestrone, such as tomatoes, beans, and Italian spices (basil, oregano, parsley), you can add whatever vegetables, pasta, and cooking liquids you have available in your refrigerator or pantry or whatever strikes your fancy.  This is also a versatile dish for the kosher kitchen, as it can be made pareve to serve with any meal, with no loss of flavor.  Sprinkling with parmigiana cheese just before serving is a dairy option, and using beef or chicken stock, or adding meat, makes a fleishig version that is even heartier and could easily serve as a main course.  Julie makes her minestrone with beef stock and hamburger meat.  Others use soup bones or pieces of chuck.  The amount of liquids used is also discretionary, depending on whether you like your minestrone thicker or soupier.  Add other vegetables if you wish, such as broccoli, cabbage, chick peas, or frozen corn or peas.  The assortment of ingredients adds not just flavor, but texture and color.  The recipe below is the version I made most recently and is totally pareve.  I could have used vegetable broth for part of the liquid, but I used just water and some red wine.  The flavor will of course vary with the specific ingredients used, but it is very hard to produce a less-than-delicious end-product.  The soup will usually thicken more when refrigerated, but just add more water, stock, or tomato juice or sauce, if you'd like to thin it out.  The recipe below can easily be doubled or tripled.

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Moroccan Lamb Tagine with Prunes and Almonds
Moroccan Lamb Tagine with Prunes and Almonds
By Joan Nathan @ 7:30 PM :: 27752 Views :: 1538 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Holidays

I first attempted this lamb dish in order to try a sephardic-style entrée for Rosh Hashanah.  It is easy to make and the flavor is very nice – something different if you're used to Eastern European traditional foods.  The three testers really enjoyed the dish and would be happy to eat it again!  The honey, sugar, and prunes provide the sweetness that is essential to a New Year festive meal.  I left out the almonds, as my daughter is allergic to them – these would add a little contrast in both color and crunch.  (Nuts are avoided in some traditions on Rosh Hashanah, but not in Morocco.)  On my next try, I am thinking of adding cubed butternut squash along with the onions and prunes.  Serve the lamb with rice pilaf and a salad.  This recipe serves 4-5 people and can easily be doubled.


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Moussaka, Israeli Style (Eggplant and Meant Casserole)
Moussaka, Israeli Style (Eggplant and Meant Casserole)
By Joan Nathan @ 7:28 PM :: 35538 Views :: 441 Comments :: :: All, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat

This recipe is from Joan Nathan’s book, The Jewish Holiday Kitchen. It came to her via the wife of a former Israeli ambassador and is a kosher version of the famous Greek moussaka, which includes dairy products along with the meat. Joan says that eggplant casseroles like this are traditional in Israel today and have their roots in Rumania, Greece, and Turkey. I made this in stages, preparing the tomato sauce and meat mixture on one day, and then doing the eggplant, assembly, and cooking on the next day.

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Mushroom and Barley Soup (Meat, Dairy, or Pareve)
Mushroom and Barley Soup (Meat, Dairy, or Pareve)
By Sue Friedman @ 7:25 PM :: 4076 Views :: 201 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Entrees / Main Courses, Meat, Dairy, Pareve

This mushroom and barley soup has a rich, thick texture and gives new meaning to the definition of comfort food! I think using fresh leeks instead of onions enhances the taste immeasurably. And, as is the case with most soups, the flavors intensify when refrigerated overnight.

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Split Pea Soup (Meat) - Jamie Stolper
Split Pea Soup (Meat) - Jamie Stolper
By Jamie Stolper @ 6:53 PM :: 2868 Views :: 273 Comments :: :: All, Soups, Meat

This is a flavorable pea soup that will not take a lot of time to prepare.  I chop the onion, celery, and carrots in the food processor (separately), and I always use beef neck bones to have some meat to add back to the pot.  Sometimes I even add a small piece of flanken, in addition to the bones.  You can also add a handful of small pasta, such as ditalini, towards the end of the cooking time, to make it even heartier.  This soup can be a first course, or a meal unto itself, especially with the meat.

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